Things to Do This Weekend in Yamhill County

March 4, 2011

Coffee Tasting at Caravan Coffee: An opportunity to learn about and taste a variety of coffees. 9:30-10 a.m. Caravan Coffee, 2750 E. Ninth Street in Newberg. For more information call 503-538-7365.

Live Music at The Horse Radish:  Music starts at 7 pm. No cover charge. Rae Gordon & 3rd D’Gris will play folk rock and R&B. 211 W. Main St., Carlton.

Newberg Art Walk at Bella Casa: 5pm-9pm. Featuring Coelho Winery and artist Cindy Stinson-Chennell. Complimentary wine tasting, food, and a wonderful evening! 700 E. 1st Street, Suite 100 Newberg, OR 97132

Gallery Theater Presents “The Tempest”: Friday March 4th show time at 7:30pm. Presented through Saturday, March 12, in Gallery Theater, 210 N.E. Ford St., McMinnville. Curtain times are 7:30 Fridays and Saturdays, and 2:30 Sundays. For more information or advance tickets, call 503-472-2227 between noon and 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. For more information, visi twww.gallerytheater.org.

March 5, 2011

Historic Open House & Tours: The McMinnville Downtown Association will be conducting two Historic Downtown Tours on Saturday, March 5, 2011: the first from 10 AM – 12:30 PM and the second 2 – 4:30 PM. The tours will begin at the Historic Cozine House, 105 NE Third St., McMinnville, OR (corner of NE Third and Adams), and meander East on Third Street. Highlights of the walking tours include upstairs spaces which are not usually open to the public, historical facts, and delightful fictions! Discover some of McMinnville’s hidden treasures. Some stair climbing will be necessary. A $5 donation is requested and reservations are required at 503.472.3605.

McMinnville Public Market: Saturdays 10-3pm. Farm Fresh Staples, Music, Activities for Kids, Vendors, Art, Wine, Access: 845 NE 5th or on the corner of 8th & Alpine near downtown McMinnville.

Live Music at The Horse Radish: Music starts at 7 pm. No cover charge. Rainbirds will play rock and blues. 211 W. Main St., Carlton.

Helpful Links for Buyers of Foreclosure, REO, & Short Sale Properties

If you are seeking to purchase a bank-owned property, a short sale or foreclosed home, you may find these links helpful.

Contact one of our real estate brokers to help you locate properties and  and work through these often complicated transactions.

http://www.hud.gov/homes/homesforsale.cfm (HUD REO Sales)

http://www.homepath.com/ (Fannie Mae REO Homes For Sale)

http://www.BuyBankHomes.com

http://mortgage.chase.com/pages/other/co_properties_landing.jsp (Chase REO Sales)

http://www2.fdic.gov/DRRORE/ (FDIC REO Sales)

http://www.HomeSales.gov/homesales/mainAction.do

http://apps.indymacbank.com/individuals/realestate/search.asp (IndyMac REO Sales)

http://www.mandtreo.com/app.aspx?st=1&e=home (M&T REO Sales)

If You Are Facing Foreclosure:

http://www.HUD.gov/local/or/homeownership/foreclosure.cfm (HUD Avoiding Foreclosure: Oregon)

http://knowyouroptions.com/resources/links (KnowYourOptions.com by Fannie Mae)

http://www.federalreserve.gov/consumerinfo/foreclosure.htm (Federal Reserve Mortgage Foreclosure Resources)

http://mresolution.com/lender_documents.aspx (Loss Mitigation Contact Info For Most Lenders)

http://www.netronline.com/ (Government public records online)

http://www.NorthWestTrustee.com/

http://www.RTrustee.com/

http://www.realtytrac.com/home/

http://www.foreclosure.com

http://www.foreclosurepulse.com/blogs/mainblog/default.aspx (RealtyTrac’s ForeclosurePulse blog)

http://www.reoexperts.net/

http://www.ForeclosurePoint.com

http://www.Cyberhomes.com

Courtesy of Cindy Dick of Willamette Valley Bank. Thanks Cindy!

Published on: Mar 3, 2011

Questions & Answers About Roof Issues

This month’s focus is on questions related to roof wear issues and replacement needs.

Q: How can I recognize when my roof system needs attention?

Unfortunately, most homeowners don’t realize they have a roof problem until after a leak occurs. Some interior signs of roof damage can be found by chance, but it is often hard to know when there is hidden damage. But doing a visual inspection at least twice-a-year can uncover obvious damage such as cracked, lifted or missing shingle; deteriorated flashings; excessive granule loss; and other visible signs of roof system problems. This inspection should also include a check indoors for stains, irregular or loose wall or ceiling finishes, peeling wallpaper or others signs of leakage, especially near chimneys or other roof penetrations. If you are unsure of how to properly inspect your roof, then it might be ideal to find a local roofing company to do this for you.

Q: How long can I expect my roof to last?

On average, any sloped roof system can be expected to last about 20 years, but the type and quality of the material, the methods of installation, local climatic factors, and degree of maintenance all play a role. Manufacturer warranties give some clue as to the expected service life of a roof. Heavyweight asphalt shingles can last up to about 35 years; slate, tile, and metal roofs can last 40, 50 or more years; but the service life of wood shingles or shakes vary widely. Roofs exposed to above normal amounts of sun, heat, or severe weather will have a shorter life than mentioned here, as will roof materials on low slope or flat roofs. Because of this, the likelihood of them needing to be repaired or re-sealed every couple of years is very high. But don’t worry, there will be someone in your area who will be able to help you should you need any work completing. For example, if you have a tile roof, then it may be in your best interest to get in touch with a company similar to panterapavers.com who will be able to restore your roof back to its former glory so that you have a safe place to live. Depending on where you live and what type of roof you have, it can be completely normal for repairs to be carried out.

A good option here on roofing is Dormer Roofs (navigate to this page to learn more), as they look stylish and can last a long time, given that the right materials are used.

Q: I have an asphalt shingle roof that is 20 years old and beginning to show signs of wear. What is involved with replacement?

Typically there a two basic options: A complete replacement of the roofing, involving a tear-off of your existing shingle, or a roof-over, which requires only the installation of new shingles over the existing ones. If there are already two or more layers of roofing, you may need to rip off all the roofs before installing the new one. Even if there is only one layer, you may need to have it removed if the shingled do not lie flat or there are other conditions that would prevent the new roof shingles from being securely fastened to the roof deck and providing a flat finished appearance. A reputable professional roofing contractor should be able to give you some direction regarding what may be an option versus what is required. In many instances, building codes allow no more than one roof-over before complete replacement is necessary. However, in other cases, an assessment can be made based on the type roof structure and type roofing.

Q: If my roof leaks, should I just go ahead and replace it rather than worry about whether a repair will hold up?

It depends. Leaks can be caused by localized shingle damage or loose or lifted roof flashings (the metal or other type waterproof membrane at chimneys, vents and other roof penetrations). In this case, a proper repair should eliminate the leakage. However, if the roof is old, or wear is widespread, then regardless of the actual cause of the current leak, complete replacement may be feasible.

Complimentary Wine Tasting this Friday at Bella Casa

How does free wine-tasting sound? How about tasting some of the very best wine our area has to offer? Join us this Friday evening at the Bella Casa office for Newberg Art Walk where we are offering complimentary wine-tasting by Coelho Winery along with art displays by Cindy Stinson-Chennell.

Friday, March 6th from 5-9pm at Bella Casa’s office in downtown Newberg.

About Coelho

Coelho wines reflect their family’s Portuguese heritage and our spirit. They farm using sustainable viticulture methods, preserving the environment and the character of our wines. Proprietors Dave and Deolinda Coelho invite you to enjoy Portuguese family hospitality in their comfortable Amity tasting room as you savor their award winning wines including estate Pinot noir, Pinot Gris, Portuguese varietals and port-style dessert wines. Visit their website at www.coelhowinery.com

The Winery: 111 5th Street Amity, Oregon 97101

In the Fall of 2003, an opportunity arose for the Coelho family to purchase a circa 1930 vacant hardware store in Amity.  In 2004, Dave and Deolinda along with their four kids, completely renovated the vacant building.  The Coelho family did the majority of the design, construction and painting along with the help of friends. The resulting space is ideal for creating premium Oregon wines. Complete with a traditional processing room, temperature and humidity controlled barrel room, and a inviting tasting room for our guests. Tasting Room Open Daily 11am – 5pm

The Vineyard

Coehlo cherishes the surrounding environment, allowing wildlife and native vegetation to support the successful growth of the vines. Kestrel boxes are placed around the vineyard to provide nesting habitat for the birds of prey, which in turn provides natural rodent control.  Grass is planted between every row to reduce the soil nutrients and increase the stress on the vines.  Judicial vine stress helps to develop more concentrated fruit flavors. Roses are planted on the end of many rows to provide an early indicator of potential insect infestation in the vineyard. All of these practices are reflectled directly in the quality of our wines.

28.5 ac. Pinot noir (Pommard & Dijon 777 clone on 101-14 rootstock)
1 ac. Pinot gris (Pinot gris 152 on 101-14 rootstock)
.5 ac. Chardonnay (Chardonnay 95 graft to Dijon clone on 101-14 rootstock)
Non-irrigated, sustainably farmed (Salmon Safe & LIVE certified)
225 feet elevation
Southern slope
North South row alignment
Woodburn soil: young, volcanic and sedimentary
45th parallel
Vineyard located 3 miles south of winery
Willamette Valley AVA